JoVE Logo
Faculty Resource Center

Sign In

Summary

Abstract

Introduction

Protocol

Representative Results

Discussion

Acknowledgements

Materials

References

Neuroscience

Immunohistochemical Analysis in the Rat Central Nervous System and Peripheral Lymph Node Tissue Sections

Published: November 14th, 2016

DOI:

10.3791/50425

1Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Neuroimmunology Unit, Center for Molecular Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, 2Department of Neuroimmunology, Center for Brain Research, Medical University of Vienna, 3Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Vascular Biology Unit, Karolinska Institutet

We here present an optimized, detailed protocol for double immunostaining in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded rat central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral lymph node (LN) tissue sections.

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) provides highly specific, reliable and attractive protein visualization. Correct performance and interpretation of an IHC-based multicolor labeling is challenging, especially when utilized for assessing interrelations between target proteins in the tissue with a high fat content such as the central nervous system (CNS).

Our protocol represents a refinement of the standard immunolabeling technique particularly adjusted for detection of both structural and soluble proteins in the rat CNS and peripheral lymph nodes (LN) affected by neuroinflammation. Nonetheless, with or without further modifications, our protocol could likely be used for detection of other related protein targets, even in other organs and species than here presented.

Despite utilization of advanced high-throughput analyses performed on the methylome, transcriptome or even proteome level, immunostaining remains the golden standard for protein detection directly in the tissue sample, cell culture or a cell smear. By revealing the localization/distribution pattern, immunohistochemistry (IHC) may assess relative ratios and topographical interrelations of the target proteins, and even indicate their biological activities. Therefore, IHC is widely utilized for clinical and research purposes, e.g., for diagnosis, treatment evaluations, study of disease mechanisms, functional and phenotypical alterations in animal models, etc....

Log in or to access full content. Learn more about your institution’s access to JoVE content here

Ethical Statement
Present study is performed in accordance with guidelines from the Swedish National Board for Laboratory Animals and the European Community Council Directive (86/609/EEC) under the ethical permits N338/09, N15/10 and N65/10, which were approved by the North Stockholm Animal Ethics Committee.

1. Tissue Preparation

  1. Perfusion & fixation
    1. Anesthetize the animal with isoflurane to perform transcardial perfusion via .......

Log in or to access full content. Learn more about your institution’s access to JoVE content here

Double immunostainings (co-stainings) were performed in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded rat CNS and LN sections. 3-5 µm thick tissue slices were cut using a sledge microtome, mounted subsequently onto pre-coated adhesive glass slides and treated as previously described 10,11,12. Briefly, after deparaffinizing, tissue rehydration and endogenous peroxidase inactivation, sections were subjected to the antigen retrieval process, followed by a blocking step to eliminate unspe.......

Log in or to access full content. Learn more about your institution’s access to JoVE content here

Standard IHC procedures often require specific adjustments to obtain an optimal result, which commonly implies extensive experience but also "trial and error" approach. From tissue preparation until target visualization, almost each step in the protocol may be subjected to individually designed modifications in order to improve the final outcome. Double staining protocol presented here exemplifies IHC-based protein targeting particularly adjusted for assessing interrelations between the target proteins of our int.......

Log in or to access full content. Learn more about your institution’s access to JoVE content here

We thank Hans Lassmann and Jan Bauer for their guidance and support. We also thank Katalin Benedek for excellent technical assistance and Caroline Westerlund for critical and linguistic appraisal.

This study was supported by grants from Biogen Idec, the Wenner-Gren Foundation, the Swedish Research Council, the Swedish Association of Persons with Neurological Disabilities, Swedish Brain Foundation, the EU 6TH Framework EURATools (LSHG-CT-2005-019015) and Neuropromise (LSHM-CT-2005-018637). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

....

Log in or to access full content. Learn more about your institution’s access to JoVE content here

Name Company Catalog Number Comments
Reagent
Isoflurane (Isofluran): 1-Chlor-2,2,2-trifluorethyl (difluormethyl ether) 2-Chlor-2-(difluormethoxy)-1,1,1-trifluorethan (C3H2ClF5O) Baxter 1001936060 Eye irradiation. Probably influences fertility and damages baby in uterus. Administer only in adequately equipped anesthetizing environment.
Sodiumchloride (NaCl) Merck 1.0604
Phosphate Buffer Saline (PBS), tablet Sigma-Aldrich P4417
Paraformaldehyde (OH(CH2O)nH (n = 8 - 100), 4% in 1x PBS Apl pharma 34 24 28 Health hazard. Corrosive. Flamable. Acute toxicity.
Ethanol ≥99.5%, absolute (CH3CH2OH) Sigma-Aldrich 459844-1L Flamable.
Xylene (Xylenes, histological grade; C6H4(CH3)2 Sigma-Aldrich 534056 Flamable. Acute toxicity.
Histo-Comp Paraffin Wax Tissue-Tek V0-5-1001
Adhesive Microscope Slides Starfrost MIC-1040-W
Xylol substitute XEM-200 Vogel GmbH ND-HS-200 Respiratory sensitization. Carcinogenicity.
α- CD8 (Ox-8) mouse anti-rat, primary antibody AbD Serotec MCA48G
α- Iba1 (AIF1) mouse anti-rat, primary antibody Millipore MABN92
α- CD68 (ED1) mouse anti-rat, primary antibody AbD Serotec MCA341R
α- eotaxin C-19 (CCL11) goat anti-rat, primary antibody Santa Cruz BT SC-6181
Alkaline phosphatase (AP)-conjugated secondary antibody Dakopatts, Denmark D0314
Biotinylated secondary antibody Amersham Biotech RPN1025
Avidin- horseradish peroxidase complex (HRP) Sigma-Aldrich A3151
Naphthol AS-MX phosphate (C19H18NO5P) Sigma-Aldrich N4875-1G Acute toxicity.
Fast Blue RR Salt, Azoic Diazo No. 24 (C15H14ClN3O3 x 1/2 ZnCl2) Sigma-Aldrich FBS25
Levamisol hydrochloride (C11H13ClN2S) Sigma-Aldrich 31742 Acute toxicity.
3,3'-Diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride (DAB Chromogen) DAKO S3000 Highly flammable. Toxic.
Copper sulphate (CuSO4) Merck 1.02791 Acute toxicity. Environmental hazzard.
GelTol Aqueous Mounting Medium Thermo Electron Corporation 230100
Hydrogen peroxide, 30% (H2O2) Merck 107210 Acute toxicity.
Methanol (CH3OH) Fluka 65543 Acute toxicity. Respiratory sensitization. Carcinogenicity. Flammable.
Tris (hydroxymethyl) aminomethane, TRIS base (C4H11NO3 ) AppliChem A1379 Skin and eye irritation.
Tris Buffered Saline (TBS), tablet Sigma-Aldrich T5030
Di- Sodium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (Na2HPO4 x 2H2O) Merck 1.0658
Sodium dihydrogen phosphate monohydrate (NaH2PO4 x 1H2O) Merck 1.06346
Fetal calf serum (FCS) Cambrex BioScience DE-14-802F
DAKO cytomation wash buffer 10x DAKO S3006 Should be stored at 2-8 °C to inhibit bacterial growth. Avoid foaming.
N,N- Dimethylformamide; DMF (C3H7NO) Fluka 40250 Flammable. Acute toxicity.
Glas coverslips 24 x 36 mm Menzel-Gläser BB024036A1
Hydrochloric acid, conc. (HCl) Sigma-Aldrich 30721 Corrosive, irritant, permeator. Lung sensitizer (as acid mist). Toxic.
Hydrochloric acid solution volumetric, 2M HCl (2N) Fluka 71826 Corrosive, irritant, permeator. Lung sensitizer (as acid mist). Toxic.
Sodium nitrite, ReagentPlus, ≥99.0% (NaNO2) Sigma-Aldrich S2252 Oxidant. Toxic. Dangerous for the environment.
Ethylenedinitrilotetraacetic acid disodium salt dihydrate (EDTA; C10H14N2Na2O8 x 2H2O) Merck 1.08454 Oral exposures may cause reproductive and developmental effects.
Equipment
Tissue-Tek V.I.P Vacuum Infiltration Processor Sakura 5902 VIP Jr. 115 V, 60 Hz
Hacker-Bright 8000 Series Base Sledge Microtome Hacker instruments
Household food steamer Braun MultiGourmet FS 20
Light microscope Leica Polyvar 2

  1. Coons, A., Creech, H. J., Jones, R. N. Immunological properties of an antibody containing a fluorescent group. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 47, 200-202 (1941).
  2. Nakane, P. K., Pierce, G. B. Enzyme-labeled antibodies: preparation and application for the localization of antigens. The journal of histochemistry and cytochemistry : official journal of the Histochemistry Society. 14, 929-931 (1966).
  3. Avrameas, S., Uriel, J. Method of antigen and antibody labelling with enzymes and its immunodiffusion application. C R Acad Sci Hebd Seances Acad Sci D. 262, 2543-2545 (1966).
  4. Mason, D. Y., Sammons, R. Rapid preparation of peroxidase: anti-peroxidase complexes for immunocytochemical use. Journal of immunological. 20, 317-324 (1978).
  5. Faulk, W. P., Taylor, G. M. An immunocolloid method for the electron microscope. Immunochemistry. 8, 1081-1083 (1971).
  6. Coons, A. H., Kaplan, M. H. Localization of antigen in tissue cells; improvements in a method for the detection of antigen by means of fluorescent antibody. The Journal of experimental medicine. 91, 1-13 (1950).
  7. Polak, J. M., Van Noorden, S. . Introduction to immunocytochemistry. , (2003).
  8. Elias, J. M., Margiotta, M., Gaborc, D. Sensitivity and detection efficiency of the peroxidase antiperoxidase (PAP), avidin-biotin peroxidase complex (ABC), and peroxidase-labeled avidin-biotin (LAB) methods. American journal of clinical pathology. 92, 62-67 (1989).
  9. Ramos-Vara, J. A. Technical aspects of immunohistochemistry. Vet Pathol. 42, 405-426 (2005).
  10. Adzemovic, M. Z., et al. Expression of Ccl11 associates with immune response modulation and protection against neuroinflammation in rats. PloS one. 7, 39794 (2012).
  11. Bauer, J., et al. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in PLP-overexpressing transgenic rats: gray matter oligodendrocytes are more vulnerable than white matter oligodendrocytes. Journal of neuropathology and experimental neurology. 61, 12-22 (2002).
  12. Bradl, M., Bauer, J., Flugel, A., Wekerle, H., Lassmann, H. Complementary contribution of CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes to T-cell infiltration of the intact and the degenerative spinal cord. The American journal of pathology. 166, 1441-1450 (2005).
  13. Zhang, C., Lam, T. T., Tso, M. O. Heterogeneous populations of microglia/macrophages in the retina and their activation after retinal ischemia and reperfusion injury. Experimental eye research. 81, 700-709 (2005).
  14. Hirasawa, T., et al. Visualization of microglia in living tissues using Iba1-EGFP transgenic mice. Journal of neuroscience research. 81, 357-362 (2005).
  15. Norment, A. M., Salter, R. D., Parham, P., Engelhard, V. H., Littman, D. R. Cell-cell adhesion mediated by CD8 and MHC class I molecules. Nature. 336, 79-81 (1988).
  16. Hoetelmans, R. W., van Slooten, H. J., Keijzer, R., Jvan de Velde, C. J., van Dierendonck, J. H. Routine formaldehyde fixation irreversibly reduces immunoreactivity of Bcl-2 in the nuclear compartment of breast cancer cells, but not in the cytoplasm. Applied immunohistochemistry & molecular morphology : AIMM / official publication of the Society for Applied Immunohistochemistry. 9, 74-80 (2001).
  17. Hayat, M. . Microscopy, Immunohistochemistry and antigen retrieval methods for light and electron microscopy. , (2002).
  18. Boenisch, T. Formalin-fixed and heat-retrieved tissue antigens: a comparison of their immunoreactivity in experimental antibody diluents. Applied immunohistochemistry & molecular morphology : AIMM / official publication of the Society for Applied Immunohistochemistry. 9, 176-179 (2001).
  19. Shi, S. R., Key, M. E., Kalra, K. L. Antigen retrieval in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues: an enhancement method for immunohistochemical staining based on microwave oven heating of tissue sections. The journal of histochemistry and cytochemistry : official journal of the Histochemistry Society. 39, 741-748 (1991).
  20. Huang, S. N. Immunohistochemical demonstration of hepatitis B core and surface antigens in paraffin sections. Laboratory investigation; a journal of technical methods and pathology. 33, 88-95 (1975).
  21. Shi, S. R., Cote, R. J., Taylor, C. R. Antigen retrieval immunohistochemistry: past, present, and future. The journal of histochemistry and cytochemistry : official journal of the Histochemistry Society. 45, 327-343 (1997).
  22. Taylor, C. R., Shi, S. R. Antigen retrieval: call for a return to first principles. Applied immunohistochemistry & molecular morphology : AIMM / official publication of the Society for Applied Immunohistochemistry. 8, 173-174 (2000).
  23. Kitamoto, T., Ogomori, K., Tateishi, J., Prusiner, S. B. Formic acid pretreatment enhances immunostaining of cerebral and systemic amyloids. Laboratory investigation; a journal of technical methods and pathology. 57, 230-236 (1987).
  24. Nelson, P. N., et al. Monoclonal antibodies. Molecular pathology : MP. 53, 111-117 (2000).
  25. Van der Loos, C. . Immunoenzyme multiple staining methods. , (1999).
  26. Elias, J. . Immunohistopathology. A practical approach to diagnosis. , (2003).
  27. Straus, W. Letter: Cleavage of heme from horseradish peroxidase by methanol with inhibition of enzymic activity. The journal of histochemistry and cytochemistry : official journal of the Histochemistry Society. 22, 908-911 (1974).
  28. Streefkerk, J. G. Inhibition of erythrocyte pseudoperoxidase activity by treatment with hydrogen peroxide following methanol. The journal of histochemistry and cytochemistry : official journal of the Histochemistry Society. 20, 829-831 (1972).
  29. Ponder, B. A., Wilkinson, M. M. Inhibition of endogenous tissue alkaline phosphatase with the use of alkaline phosphatase conjugates in immunohistochemistry. The journal of histochemistry and cytochemistry : official journal of the Histochemistry Society. 29, 981-984 (1981).
  30. Petrelli, F., Coderoni, S., Moretti, P., Paparelli, M. Effect of biotin on phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation of rat liver histones. Molecular biology reports. 4, 87-92 (1978).
  31. Yagi, T., Terada, N., Baba, T., Ohno, S. Localization of endogenous biotin-containing proteins in mouse Bergmann glial cells. The Histochemical journal. 34, 567-572 (2002).
  32. Van Hecke, D. Routine Immunohistochemical Staining Today: Choices to Make, Challenges to Take. Journal of Histotechnology. 1, 45-54 (2002).

This article has been published

Video Coming Soon

JoVE Logo

Privacy

Terms of Use

Policies

Research

Education

ABOUT JoVE

Copyright © 2024 MyJoVE Corporation. All rights reserved