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Linking Predation Risk, Herbivore Physiological Stress and Microbial Decomposition of Plant Litter

DOI :

10.3791/50061-v

10:20 min

March 12th, 2013

March 12th, 2013

12,539 Views

1School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, Yale University, 2Department of Biological Sciences, Virginia Tech, 3Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

We present methods to evaluate how predation risk can alter the chemical quality of herbivore prey by inducing dietary changes to meet demands of heightened stress, and how the decomposition of carcasses from these stressed herbivores slows subsequent plant litter decomposition by soil microbes.

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Predation Risk

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