JoVE Logo
Faculty Resource Center

Sign In

Using Coculture to Detect Chemically Mediated Interspecies Interactions

DOI :

10.3791/50863-v

October 31st, 2013

October 31st, 2013

13,371 Views

1Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Bacteria produce secreted compounds that have the potential to affect the physiology of their microbial neighbors. Here we describe a coculture screen that allows detection of such chemically mediated interspecies interactions by mixing soil microbes with fluorescent transcriptional reporter strains of Bacillus subtilis on solid media.

Tags

Keywords Coculture

-- Views

Related Videos

article

Microfluidic Co-culture of Epithelial Cells and Bacteria for Investigating Soluble Signal-mediated Interactions

article

Analysis of Schwann-astrocyte Interactions Using In Vitro Assays

article

The MultiBac Protein Complex Production Platform at the EMBL

article

Rapid Synthesis and Screening of Chemically Activated Transcription Factors with GFP-based Reporters

article

Discovering Protein Interactions and Characterizing Protein Function Using HaloTag Technology

article

Determination of Protein-ligand Interactions Using Differential Scanning Fluorimetry

article

Probing High-density Functional Protein Microarrays to Detect Protein-protein Interactions

article

Using Caenorhabditis elegans to Screen for Tissue-Specific Chaperone Interactions

article

Culture Methods to Study Apical-Specific Interactions using Intestinal Organoid Models

article

Bioinformatics Resources for the Study of Glycan-Mediated Protein Interactions

JoVE Logo

Privacy

Terms of Use

Policies

Research

Education

ABOUT JoVE

Copyright © 2024 MyJoVE Corporation. All rights reserved