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Using a Microfluidics Device for Mechanical Stimulation and High Resolution Imaging of C. elegans

DOI :

10.3791/56530-v

February 19th, 2018

February 19th, 2018

9,544 Views

1Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, 2Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, 3Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, 4Group of Neurophotonics and Mechanical Systems Biology, The Institute of Photonic Sciences (ICFO)

New tools for mechanobiology research are needed to understand how mechanical stress activates biochemical pathways and elicits biological responses. Here, we showcase a new method for selective mechanical stimulation of immobilized animals with a microfluidic trap allowing high-resolution imaging of cellular responses.

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Keywords Microfluidics

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