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Rodent Brain Microinjection to Study Molecular Substrates of Motivated Behavior

DOI :

10.3791/53018-v

10:05 min

September 16th, 2015

September 16th, 2015

13,898 Views

1Virginia Institute for Psychiatric and Behavioral Genetics, Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, 2Institute for Drug and Alcohol Studies, Departments of Psychiatry, Pharmacology, and Neuroscience, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine

Rodents are an appropriate model to investigate the molecular substrates of behavior and complex psychiatric disorders. Brain microinjection in awake rodents can be used to elucidate disease substrates. An efficient and customizable brain microinjection method as well as the execution of an operant paradigm that quantifies motivation is presented.

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Rodent Brain Microinjection

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